The Trans-Canada Respect Monument

Respect Monument Plans

Unveiling and Dedication October 19,  2017

A permanent RESPECT monument on the Trans-Canada Highway, to become a new Montreal landmark for Canada’s 150th anniversary, Montreal’s 375th anniversary and the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Vimy Ridge. The monument is supported by community donations along with private and public grants.

Why a Monument?

To act as a permanent testament and memorial to honour the men and women who have served and sacrificed in their service to Canada and the promotion of peace around the world. The monument will also serve as a continuous reminder of our serving military and veterans suffering from PTSD and homelessness.

The Return Monument

The Sculpture:

The sculpture is called “The Return” and it depicts a World War II veteran who has come home from war with his arm extended offering a victory/peace sign. He has returned. He stands to remind us that for many who come home there is no victory. They have not found peace. They remain in the conflict where they were serving. They have not returned home. They should not be left behind.

Components:
- Bronze statue of a WWII Soldier
- Granite base
- RESPECT backdrop
- Auxiliary benches
- Inauguration cornerstone
- Participation donor sign

Location:
Sited along a highly visible section of the Trans-Canada highway in Kirkland, Quebec.
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About the Artist

Colonel (Canadian Armed Forces, Retired) Andre D. Gauthier OMM, CD, is a Canadian monument sculptor and designer in various materials including bronze casting.

The Royal Military College of Canada Gauthier Collection consists of 60 sculptures. His works are found in military and private collections in Canada, the United States and internationally. Military units have presented his sculptures to cities with which they have had a long association. His works have been presented to a member of the British Royal Family, the Governor General of Canada, two Canadian Prime Ministers, Canadian Cabinet Ministers and dozens of visiting foreign dignitaries. Five of his works are in the permanent art collection of the Canadian War Museum (Ottawa, Canada).

Commemoration and Appreciation

The monument will commemorate the past service of the men and women of our Canadian Armed Forces and those who serve today. It will honour the sacrifice of those we have lost, those who have been injured and the families whose lives have been forever changed. It will stand for the respect of those who continue to suffer long after the conflict is over and their duty is done. It will create awareness and serve as a continuous reminder of our serving military and veterans that suffer from PTSD and homelessness.